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Do Your Flexible Ducts Pass the Code?

1 May 2014

The 2013 Building Code of Australia (BCA) as part of the National Construction Code (NCC) took effect on 1 May 2013. With this came some changes to the labeling requirements for ducts. So with winter fast approaching and the demand for installs and unit changeovers of heating systems set to increase, it’s important to refer to the NCC to ensure your ductwork is compliant.

The most important change is the new requirement for labeling of flexible duct laid out in AS4254.1-2012, which now requires the name of the duct manufacturer/assembler, the polyester insulation material R-value and compliance to AS4254.1.

So what does this mean for you?

Don’t get caught out with an unlabeled duct which is not compliant with AS4254.1- 2012 and therefore not compliant with 2013 National Construction Code (NCC).

Where does the NCC 2013 apply?

Commercial Applications – Class 2 to 9 Buildings (Volume 1)

Nationally in all States and Territories for all constructions that are issued building permits from 1 May 2013, except for Northern Territory, which will continue to use BCA 2009.

Domestic Applications – Class 1 + 10 Buildings (Volume 2)

Nationally in all States and Territories for all constructions that are issued building permits from 1 May 2013, except for Tasmania and Northern Territory, which will continue to use BCA 2009.

Are there any exemptions?

The NCC is developed and maintained by the Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB) on behalf of the Commonwealth in conjunction with the State and Territory Governments, who each have statutory responsibility for building control and regulation within their jurisdiction. The NCC is the national building code, which is administered at a State and Territory level.

For commercial, the 2013 NCC provides a number of variations for Section J on a State by State and Class basis. So it’s best if flexible duct specifiers and users familiarise themselves with the local requirements.

It’s also worth noting that these requirements apply to all new buildings and some renovations, but there are no state requirements, such as NSW BASIX or Victorian 6-star, that vary the NCC requirements for ductwork. The provisions for ductwork relate to the deemed-to-satisfy provisions, and designers looking to offer an “alternative solution” would need to refer to the Code.

Want to know more?

All relevant sections, including the NCC climate zone maps, can be downloaded from the Australian Duct Manufacturers Alliance (ADMA) www.adma.net.au, or you can contact Peter Kikos from ADMA on (03) 9329 9622.

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